Two More Customer Service Lessons From A Customer Experience Fail

Enhancing Customer Experiences and Improving Customer Satisfaction

Over the past two weeks we have been sharing some important customer service lessons from our personal customer experience fail with Flagship Cruises & Events while on a family holiday in San Diego last month.

Here are our final two lessons in improving the customer experience and increase the satisfaction of your customers from this incident. You may need to read these three blog posts to get a full background on these lessons:

San Diego Cruise Line Fails to Understand Customer Needs

Customer Service Lessons From A Customer Experience Fail

More Customer Service Lessons From A Customer Experience Fail

 

Lesson #5: Learn From Industry Best Practitioners

As I have written before, every customer interaction is an opportunity to build long-term loyaltyThe best organizations in every industry know and understand this.

For instance, Disneyland has Disney characters roaming their theme parks offering to take photos of customers with the customer’s own cameras. There are even photo stations around each park where Disney characters are scheduled to appear.

Yes, Disneyland has employees also taking photos for families in the hopes of selling these later. But they are also willing to assist in having photos taken with their guests’ own phones and cameras.

The last thing a Disneyland theme park employee would ever do is attempt to physically block a customer from taking a photo with their own phone or camera (as the Flagship Cruise’s staff member did to us).

The same is true at the famed San Diego Zoo and their sister location Safari Park. At both venues employees were gracious and more than willing to take photos of us using our own equipment.

The key lesson here is that customer expectations are set not only by the communications and policies of your organization, but also by the actions and policies of other suppliers in your industry (and other industries as well quite frankly).

Lesson #6: Be Proactive In Handling Customer Complaints

In our Keeping Good Customers Blog last year we explained why Customer Complaints Are Good.

Of course, they are only good if you act upon them! Properly. Service recovery starts with how you react to a customer complaint.

In this case, the only reaction to date from Flagship Cruises to my publicly announced complaint on their facebook page was a reply from “trongley@flagshipsd.com” saying:

Thanks for reaching out Steven. We’d like to hear more about what happened.
Could you please reach out to me directly at trongley@flagshipsd.com?”

Apparently this staff member of Flagship Cruises believes that I need to proactively seek him or her out to further explain my dissatisfaction with their service. And here I was thinking that I am the customer!

When I bought our tickets for their whale watching cruise, I supplied both by email address and my mobile phone number. In fact, I get a weekly marketing email from Flagship Cruises attempting to solicit further business from me.

So there is no excuse for their failure to contact me to “hear more about what happened.” Passivity in reacting to a customer complaint, particularly one shared through social media, is unacceptable in today’s world.

It has now been over a month since our unfortunate and unacceptable customer experience with Flagship Cruises, and yet no one has contacted us. Not even after others replied to my post on their Facebook page. And not even after three weeks of using this customer experience fail as a customer service lesson for all.

The customer should not have to write you or call you after having voiced a public complaint. Organizations that excel at customer service know the importance of Making It Easy For Customers To Complain. Handling customer complaints properly impacts all current and future customers ─ and starts with processes, procedures, and systems that make it easy for such complaints to be communicated to your organization.

So, there you have it. Six important customer service lessons from one single customer experience fail. I hope these lessons will help you and your organization enhance the customer experiences you are providing and increase your customer satisfaction levels.

 

Customer Service Lessons From A Customer Experience Fail

Enhancing Customer Experiences and Customer Satisfaction Levels

In last week’s Monday Morning Marketing Memo we shared the dissatisfying experiences we had recently with Flagship Cruises & Events and how this San Diego cruise line fails to understand customer needs.

This week we will share some of the customer service lessons from this customer experience fail. You may need to read last week’s blog post to get the full background on these lessons: Flagship Cruises Customer Experience Fail.

Lesson #1: Birthdays are important.

Everybody likes to have memorable birthday experiences. This makes birthdays a great opportunity for any organization to provide an exceptional experience that is not only memorable, but will also result in positive word-of-mouth publicity as well. After all, the little things matter in customer service.

For instance, Flagship Cruises could have party balloons at its cruise check-in point and use these in the photos it takes of those celebrating a birthday or anniversary. The chances of increased sales of such photos are extremely high.

Additionally, instead of having an attitude that helping to celebrate one’s birthday on a public cruise is “too difficult,” this company could proactively create memorable experiences such as letting the birthday celebrant take photos in the wheelhouse with the captain, or even holding the ship’s wheel. After all, how difficult is that to implement during the course of a four-hour cruise?

The bottom line is if you help your customers create happy and memorable birthday experiences they will be guaranteed to share their experiences with family members and friends.

Lesson #2: Policies are fine. Exceptions are critical.

There may be numerous valid reasons for the “no taking of personal photos” rule enforced by Flagship Cruises. These could include speed of moving customers to the waiting area, hopes of increased photos sales by prohibiting personal photos, reduced agitation by customers in line having to wait a few extra minutes to board, etc.

For each supposedly valid reason I could counter with equally valid reasons and process to avoid anticipated fallout. Of course, I approach such situations from my marketing philosophy of if it touches the customer, it’s a marketing issue.™

Rigidly enforced rules, with no empowerment to frontline staff to make exceptions, is bad policy. We are well past the days when being customer-oriented meant operating in order to meet the needs of the typical customer. Every customer has individual wants, needs, desires, likes, and dislikes. Businesses today cannot afford to build operations and policies attuned to meet only the needs of the average customer. To be fully successful, and to avoid negative and dissatisfying customer experiences, businesses need to be flexible in how policies, procedures, and processes are implemented.

So let’s turn this rule on its head. Since Flagship Cruises appears to like rigidly enforced rules, here’s a new rule they can implement:

“Customers celebrating birthdays and couples celebrating anniversaries
today will be allowed to take their own celebratory pictures
at our famed life preserver post.
Thank you for helping us make their special day even more memorable.”

If they posted a plaque with this “rule” at the entryway, other customers would not feel inconvenienced by the handful of people taking their own photos. In fact, some in line will likely shout out birthday and anniversary greetings, or even start a chorus of the Happy Birthday song.

These are just a couple of lessons, and ideas, on how to move from a customer experience failure to a memorable customer service experience.

Next week we will share two more valuable lessons that will help you enhance your customer experiences and customer satisfaction levels.

 

 

Customer ENTHUSIASM

Fire Up the Enthusiasm of Your Staff for Your Customers

While doing research a few years ago for one of my marketing books, I came across a note I had written to myself on creating enthusiasm for customers within an organization.

In the note, I turned the word enthusiasm into an acronym:

Enjoy your work. When you enjoy your work, customers enjoy you.

Never say “no.” Find ways to say “yes” to customers.

Take the time needed to fully satisfy the customer. The best gift to offer customers is your attention and time.

Hustle. Time is valuable, help customers save it by serving them efficiently and fast.

Understand before trying to be understood. You cannot satisfy customer needs until you listen.

Smile. Your smile tells the customer he or she has come to the right person.

Insist on astonishing. Merely satisfying customers is not enough. Astonish.

Ask if the customer is completely satisfied. Ensure customer satisfaction by asking if there is anything else you can do and if what you have done is enough to have them return to you again in the future.

Suggestive sell. Suggest related items that make the customer’s purchase better.

Meaningful “thank you.” A sincere thank you builds loyalty that brings back customers.

Legendary American football coach Vince Lombardi is quoted as saying “If you aren’t fired with enthusiasm, you will be fired with enthusiasm.”

We are not suggesting that you need to start enthusiastically firing your staff. But we do hope that the ENTHUSIASM acronym might be useful to you in firing up the enthusiasm of your staff for your customers.

Otherwise, it may be your customers who fire you with enthusiasm.

KEY POINT:  never say “no” to a customer; find ways of saying “yes” instead.

TAKING ACTION: are your frontline staff and customer contact personnel only measured on quantitative scores such as how many customers per work shift they handle? Why?

How can you institute some qualitative scoring measures tracking how their handling of customers impacts your customer retention results?

Train your staff to take the time necessary to fully understand the needs, wants, desires, likes, and dislikes of your customers. Time spent with customers is rarely wasted.

Teach your staff not to be afraid to ask customers if they are fully satisfied. Without asking, you will never know their true feelings. Asking shows that the organization cares and wants these customers to return again and again.

This article is excerpted from our book The Best of the Monday Morning Marketing Memo, available in paperback and Kindle formats at Amazon.

 

A World of Customer Experiences

Every customer interaction is an opportunity to build long-term loyalty.

Customers buy experiences.

That is the premise behind the book Building Great Customer Experiences which I had the pleasure of reading several years ago.

The authors, Colin Shaw and John Ivens, have seven philosophies for building a great customer experience, including:

  • Great customer experiences are a source of long-term competitive advantage.
  • Great customer experiences are both revenue generating and cost reducing.
  • Great customer experiences are an embodiment of the brand.

In a world of product parity and commoditization of both products and services, their arguments make a great deal of sense. And even when customers buy products or services, they repeat buy based on their previous experiences.

It is interesting to observe how many organizations focus only on the customer experience at the beginning of the sales cycle, rather than at all points of interaction.

For instance, how many large retail stores have a greeter who welcomes people as they enter the store, but have no one to say “thank you” as the customers leave with their purchases?

Even worse, there are the stores that have people at the exits checking everyone’s shopping bags to make sure nothing is being stolen. How many thieves are caught or prevented by this? A few a week? That is not necessarily a good trade-off for making hundreds of people a day feel like their privacy is being violated or, worse, that they are being falsely considered as shoplifters.

People often cite the phrase that first impressions matter most. From a marketing perspective, I disagree. I often write that it is the last impression that matters most.

For instance, you may have a wonderful check-in experience and an enjoyable in-flight experience, but if your bags are not on the carousel promptly (or at all) at your final destination that will be the thing you remember most about your flight and the airline you flew.

Or, you may have wonderful help in the aisles of a store, but if you encounter a rude and surly cashier at the check-out counter that will be what you remember most of that particular visit to that store.

The entire shopping experience at Amazon is a delightful experience. This company understands the mentality of people who want to buy books, videos, CDs, and other merchandise from an online outlet. Likewise, Borders understands the mentality of people who want to buy books, videos, CDs, and other merchandise in a “bricks and mortar” retail outlet. Both are sellers of books. But, more important, both are sellers (and deliverers) of unique customer experiences.

The success of Starbucks comes not just from the taste of their coffee, but from the customer experiences they deliver to their sit-down and chat, take-away, and even drive-through customers. Buying and drinking a coffee from Starbucks is an experience, one that an increasing number of customers around the world appear to enjoy and repeat.

One of the secrets to increasing customer loyalty is to fully understand all the experiences customers have with your organization when they investigate, evaluate, purchase, use, and dispose of your products and services. Each point of interaction is an opportunity to build long-term customer loyalty. Each point of interaction is an opportunity for your organization to better understand your customers.

Your competitors can copy your products, replicate your services, and match your pricing strategies.

This means that the customer experience you deliver is one of the few marketing advantages remaining to keep your customers loyal and to convert occasional buyers into long-term and loyal customers.

In a world of customer experiences, sustainable growth will come to those who monitor and improve the experiences of customers at each and every point of interaction.

KEY POINT:  every point of interaction is an opportunity to build long-term customer loyalty.

TAKING ACTION:   walk through every location that your customers visit or see. What needs cleaning, fixing, brightening, toning down? Who are the staff talking with:  themselves or customers?  What do customers see in your environment ─ a company in control or one so cluttered it appears to be in control of nothing?

Touch everything your customers will touch. What feels good? What does not? What is warm?  What is cold? Is it nice to feel?  How do you react to this? How do your customers react to this?

Close your eyes and listen to the environment. What do you hear? Is the music too loud or not appropriate for your target customers? Are the staff talking about themselves or about customers and their needs?

Examine all forms.  Fill them out as if you were a customer. How can these be improved?

Call your call center with a complaint. How is this handled?

Call your call center with a query. How is this handled?

Review your website. How easy is it to contact your organization via the website? What information is lacking or missing (from a customer’s perspective)?

This article is mostly excerpted from our book The Best of the Monday Morning Marketing Memo, available at Amazon in Kindle and paperback formats.

7 Laws of Customer Retention Marketing

Change Your Definition of CRM to mean Customer Retention Marketing

I have long struggled with the concept of Customer Relationship Management (CRM), mostly for the simple reason that I fully understand that customers do not want their relationships with an organization “managed.”

This is why the whole notion and philosophy of CRM as customer relationship management is wrong.

In my keynote speech a few years ago at the Services Marketing Conference in Kuala Lumpur, one of my key messages was that marketers and senior management really need to think of CRM as Customer Retention Marketing.

This is what true CRM is all about – retaining customers, or as I like to call it the art of keeping good customers.™

To implement this definition of CRM in your organization, you will need to inculcate the following 7 Laws of Customer Retention Marketing into your culture, processes, and thinking:

  1. The conversion of a prospect to a purchaser is the casting of a potential long-term relationship with a possible customer. A purchaser who buys from you the first time is merely a trial user. A customer is not a true customer until the second time they buy from you. Forget the notions that “the relationship starts with a purchase,” or “you are not closing a sale, you are starting a relationship.” As we have pointed out previously, the relationship starts way back in the information seeking stage of the buying cycle, at least from the customer’s perspective.

The art of keeping good customers means that your entire organization should be geared to ensure that every experience received by a customer (including a first-time purchaser) should result in that customer repeating their future purchases from you whenever you have a product or solution that meets their needs or solves a problem for them.

  1. You do not work for your employer ─ you work for your customers. Sure, someone in the company signs your proverbial paycheck (or authorizes the direct deposit into your account). But those checks and deposits would bounce if it were not for the customers who buy from your organization. When someone asks you “who do you work for?” your reply should be “our customers” or “the customers of (name of organization).”
  2. You do not sell products or services ─you sell solutions that meet the needs, wants, and desires of your customers. As pithy as this sounds, it is something that way too many organizations and workers these days just do not seem to understand.
  3. Customers want relationships with people and organizations they trust, that are committed to them, and with whom they have shared goals. All of us can buy products and services from a vast number of suppliers and outlets. But we choose to have continual relationships, and to repeat our business, with those we trust and with those whom we have shared outcomes.
  4. Employees should be liberated ─ and allowed to be customer champions. Almost all staff want to serve customers well, if only their organizations would let them! Unfortunately many organizations have rules, processes, procedures, and policies that tie the hands of their employees and prevent them from truly serving customers and satisfying their wants, needs, and desires.
  5. Do not have a commitment to customer service ─ have a commitment to customers (and to customer care). We are definitely in the age of the customer. Customers have many choices and options available to them. But they also all share a deficit of sufficient time. Caring about customers means committing to the things customers place high value on ─ flexibility, sufficient knowledge and information, convenience, ability to choose functions relevant to them, customization, and environmental concerns.

And, of course, good service, which in today’s world is now a prerequisite for repeat business as customers will simply not put up with bad service, inconvenience, inflexible policies and procedures, and a lack of options for customization and personalization.

  1. Customer Service staff should be fired ─ and replaced with Customer Satisfaction staff. This is not a matter of semantics. Customer service tends to be either reactive (to a situation) or a follow-up activity (to a complaint).

Customer service, which is problem resolution focused, is usually initiated by the customer, when he or she has a problem. On the other hand, customer satisfaction is proactive and is customer focused.

Customer satisfaction is usually initiated by the organization to improve the quality of the relationship with the customer. The corollary of this rule is that customer service scorecards, measurements, and matrixes should be replaced with indices that measure and monitor customer satisfaction.

In the typical CRM thinking found today, the organization is the center of focus, thinking, and planning. And the measurement tools used are indicators that support managerial bonuses.

In my Customer Retention Marketing model, the customer is the focus and occupies the central platform for all thinking, planning, and strategic focus. The result becomes the optimization of customer-first processes and the continued improvement in the quality of customer interactions.

Your organization will accomplish a great deal more, and be more highly successful, by changing your definition of CRM to Customer Retention Marketing.

 

KEY POINT: change your definition of CRM to mean Customer Retention Marketing.

TAKING ACTION: survey your employees and ask them this open ended question: “what do we sell to customers?” If they give you a long list of products and services it is time to educate them that you are selling solutions, not products and services.

Review the tools and measurements you use to track and monitor customer service. How could these be turned into tools and measurements to track and monitor customer satisfaction?

Prepare an entire issue of your next employee newsletter (or staff memo) on the subject of customer retention marketing, and what the implications are for the organization in terms of customer care, customer satisfaction measurements, liberating of customer contact personnel, changes in policies and procedures, and how you will reward the organization for making the change to customer retention marketing.

 

This article is excerpted from our book The Best of the Monday Morning Marketing Memo, available at Amazon in Kindle and paperback formats.

For more thoughts on customer retention marketing, read our Keeping Good Customers Blog on Tuesdays and Thursdays.